ELD and ELD exempt FAQ’s: Obscure Electronic Logging Device answers

Recently, our customers have been asking us some specific questions about the ELD (or Electronic Logging Device) Mandate. As Roadcheck Inspection Week approaches, we wanted to published a quick FAQ of the questions we have seen so far. Whether you are already using an ELD or are ELD exempt, keep reading on! Be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Everything about the ELD, as well!

Let’s jump in!

1. What are my HoS rules?

Generally, car haulers are required to follow the 11 and 14 hours rule:
– Each day, a driver can work for 14 consecutive hours maximum (On-Duty)
– Of those 14 work hours, only 11 hours can be driving time
– During a work day, a driver is REQUIRED to take a 30 minute break sometime in the first 8 of his 11 hours.
– After his On Duty hours are over, he is required to rest 10 hours before his next shift.
– A driver is not allowed to exceed 70 hours of work in 8 consecutive days.
– Finally, a driver can “re-set” the 70 hour clock by resting for 34 consecutive hours.

2. How do I know if I’m ELD exempt?

For car haulers and auto transporters, there are few exemptions to the ELD rule. The most common exemption is the Short Haul exemption. A short haul driver would be ELD exempt if:
– The driver starts and ends his workday at the same geographical location (same city)
– He or She works no more than 12 consecutive hours a day

– They have a 10 consecutive hour rest breaks after each shift
– The driver works within a 100 air mile radius

3. What is an Air Mile?

An air mile is the miles a plane would make from one place to another; it is a shorter unit of distance than a traditional traveling mile, because it is a straight line. For instance, Houston to Austin is around 160 miles. But in air miles, they are only about 140 miles apart. This distinction could mean the difference between hundreds of dollars for an ELD for many drivers.

4. What if sometimes I fall into an exempt category, but not always?

FMCSA and DoT know that truck driving is not a predictable job. If you generally fall within the guidelines for “exempt,” but occasionally work more than 12 consecutive hours or exceed 100 air miles, there is leeway for you.
A driver may continue to use paper logs if he falls within the exemption rules 22 of 30 consecutive days.

For instance, if you drive between Kansas City and St. Louis three or four times a month, you would not be required to keep an electronic logging device on board.
If you exceed your exemption more than 8 days out of 30 consecutive days, that is when you must record your Hours of Service using an ELD.

5. If I am exempt, can I use the Super Dispatch app to record HoS?

The TMS by Car Carriers, for Car Carriers. Helps track hours of service for ELD exempt driversAccording to the Director of Roadside Inspection Program at the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance, you CAN record Hours of Service by using Super Dispatch or other MANUAL electronic recording devices. BE WARY: you are required to be able to print out paper logs on the spot, if requested by a DoT officer. Some Drivers find it more feasible to continue using paper logs because of this rule. Other drivers find that the Super Dispatch DVIR and HoS recording feature saves enough time and money that it is worth it to buy a small wireless printer for their truck.

Do you have more questions? Let us know what other questions you have, and we will update this post, or head over to our Ultimate ELD Guide so you can learn everything you need to know about the ELD!


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[…] you want a little more information? Head over to the ELD and ELD Exempt FAQ post, where we expanded on the […]