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How to pick up a car at an Auto Auction: Manheim

Chances are, if you’re an auto hauler, have a trailer and are ready to pick up cars, you’ve heard of Manheim. Though they don’t have their own load board, Manheim cars make up a huge portion of what is posted on the industry’s leading load boards. With over 80 locations in almost every state, Manheim (owned by Cox Automotive) is one of the largest auto auctions in the country.

For auto haulers to find a load, get to Manheim, find the vehicle in the lot and load it onto the trailer can be tedious, so we made a handy guide for your first time at Manheim.

With a Manheim Auto Auction here in Kansas City, Super Dispatch interviewed carriers, brokers, and a Manheim lot manager for the scoop on how to survive your first car pickup.

We spoke with Sue, a long-time Dispatcher and part time broker of Murphy Auto Transport; Charles, the Owner and Dispatcher at Alpha Elite Transport; and Kansas City Manheim Lot Manager Sam to give you the best starter tips.

 

First we are going to show you the Reader’s Digest of the entire process.
Then give you tips
) wherever we have found them:

 

Manheim, Super Dispatch, auto auction, helpful, tips, car hauler

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 2: DISCUSSING SPECIFICS

“Always verify if the car is inoperable or not,” says Sue of Murphy Auto Transport. “A car can’t be moved to a trailer by one person if it’s inoperable and it will cost you more more money and time to get a wench. If you don’t verify this at first, you won’t know what invisible costs you are eating.” A dispatcher or Owner Operator might be able to do this by directly asking the Broker if a car is operable or not, or by asking what lot the car will be in. If a car is in a TRA lot, that means it is an inoperable car.

P.S. The auto auction parks inoperable cars in the TRA (Total Resource Auction) lot, but Drivers will often move vehicles and leave them wherever is the most convenient. Always make sure a car is operable even if it’s not in the TRA lot.

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 3: GATE PASS VERIFICATION

“Gate passes, gate passes, gate passes,” says Super Dispatch customer Charles of Alpha Elite Transport. “Always check the gate passes.”

What Charles means is, make sure that the Gate Passes for the cars you are hauling are actually available. A Driver proves that he is allowed to pick up a car using the ID numbers on the Gate Passes. Charles has had experiences where Brokers haven’t secured the Gate Passes for the cars they posted on a load board – which means that Charles can’t send a driver pick them up. If a Dispatcher or Owner Operator doesn’t get the Gate Passes in an email from a Broker, a Driver will have to wait until his Dispatcher gets them.

Sam of Manheim told Super Dispatch that Manheim legally can’t give out information on cars parked in their lots to just anyone. A Dispatcher or Owner / Operator will always have to call the Broker for that information. Though it’s not common, a Dispatcher can ask a Broker if he or she will put the name of the Dispatcher or his company on the Gate Pass. That way, the Dispatcher will be able to contact Manheim directly to ask about the cars, instead of playing phone tag with a Broker

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 4: MANHEIM HOURS VERIFICATION

“You think that the Manheim in St. Louis is 24 hours like the one in Detroit, but you’d be wrong,” Charles said to Super Dispatch. “We learned that one the hard way.”

 

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 6: GUARD SHACK CHECK IN

Guard Shacks are the gatekeepers to the car lots at Manheim and an employee is always there during business hours. Make sure your drivers know that – time permitting – employees at the Guard Shack can:

– drive your driver to his or her load pick up spots
– jumpstart cars with dead batteries
– provide gas to empty cars

These services won’t always be available to Drivers, so there are ways to save time (and money.)

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 7: FINDING THE CARS

Even if a Guard Shack worker can drive your driver to his or her car pick up location, they won’t know if the car has been moved by another driver. A Driver can spend hours looking for each car at Manheim if he or she is inexperienced, which costs tons in ELD hours, money and time. Sue suggests something else.

“Car pullers are people that will charge you a fee for pulling cars [out of the lot] but they will make all the damages and do everything my driver is supposed to do.” said Sue. “Then all my driver has to do is drive in there, load [the car] up and go.” 

 Car pullers will charge anywhere from 5 or 10 dollars per vehicle.

“It’s well worth what you save, especially with the new ELD law…” she said. “I’ve had guys sit there for 6 hours looking for cars.”

Sue suggests looking on Facebook pages like Auto Transport Everything to find car pullers in each city before your driver arrives. A Dispatcher can give this person the ID number for the Gate Pass and the Car Puller can have the entire car ready before the Driver ever arrives.

If you use a Car Puller, make sure they take photos of their Gate Passes for your own records.

Super Dispatch, ManheimSTEP 8: MARKING DAMAGES

In fact, Drivers should always take photos of their Gate Passes before handing them off to the auto hauler elog and BOL app for car haulersGuard Shack. Unlike using Super Dispatch, once you fill out a Gate Pass damage report and hand it to the Guard Shack, it’s out of your hands forever.

“I always tell my drivers to take a photo of the gate passes after you have marked damages and before you hand them to the Guard Shack, because once it’s gone, it’s gone,” Sue said.

 

Do you have other tips for surviving at pick up at Manheim? Let us know in the comments!

OOIDA vs. FMCSA – Is This The Biggest Legal Battle In Trucking History?

Trucking Industry Main Event: OOIDA vs. FMCSA

For years, the FMCSA has contended that truck drivers should no longer be able to manually enter their own hours of service and duty status into their daily driving logs, and instead, that an electronic device automatically captures this data every time that trucker steps foot inside of his or her commercial motor vehicle. While this may sound like the perfect solution for a manager supervising efficiency, this ‘additionally pervasive regulation’ poses serious questions and conflicts of interest with respect to an individual’s privacy rights, their exposure to workplace harassment, and a sobering vagueness relating to constitutional Fourth Amendment enforcement of search and seizure laws.

Electronic Logging DeviceAs a result, oral arguments are set to be heard on September 13th in the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in support of a Petitioner’s Brief that has been filed by a prominent Washington D.C. law firm on behalf of the OOIDA and its approximate 157,000 members. To be sure, lawyers for the OOIDA will remind the panel of three judges that it was only five years ago when this very same court struck down a previous effort by the FMCSA to advance their proposed “ELD” law 49 U.S.C. 31137 toward final approval. And even though Congress has directed the Secretary of Transportation to prescribe these new electronic regulations, the FMCSA has yet to successfully execute that federal mandate.

…this ‘additionally pervasive regulation’ poses serious questions and conflicts of interest with respect to an individual’s privacy rights…

What Happens If A Law Is Enacted Requiring Live Recording Of Location And Activity Of All Commercial Truck Drivers 24/7?

Put yourself in their shoes. From now on, what if every time you got into a vehicle and turned the ignition key a facial recognition dash cam recorder turned on? And then a screen gave you a drop down menu from which you were to pick whether you are working, having personal time, or resting. No big deal, right? Productivity and safety first!

We The PeopleBut what happens when you choose “on-duty,” you’re driving down the road, then a sudden family emergency arises, you’re trying to handle it, but then you get pulled over by an officer because your route and stress levels were showing up as irregular. And then while he’s questioning you on whether you’re still “on-duty” or “enjoying personal conveyance,” your boss calls and asks you why you “stopped driving” and “what’s going on?” And then you receive an alert that this entire event will stay on your permanent driving record. Oh, how did it all go so wrong?!

It’s what some refer to as a “Brave New World” where “Big Brother” is always looking over your shoulder. Is that a genuine concern, or are some people just being paranoid? You are welcome to download and read the entire OOIDA vs. FMCSA Petitioner’s Brief HERE. It’s a 69-page legal document outlining the case background, previous case law, legal arguments, and some of the serious consequences at stake. After all, there is no question that new laws of this caliber have great potential to infringe upon individuals. The question is: how far are we willing to let them go in the name of safety and efficiency?

It’s what some refer to as a “Brave New World” where “Big Brother” is always looking over your shoulder.

For more information, you can visit the OOIDA Foundation website or OOIDA.com and please feel free to leave a comment below and let us know what you think. Thanks, and keep on trucking.

– Super Jay

10.17.18 UPDATE: we have some new posts related to the ELD and car hauling industry for car haulers that are still new owner operators, dispatchers or fleet drivers. Check it out!

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